archive for the 'Pre-Reading/Comprehension' category

Cow Visual Discrimination File Folder Game

Here’s a fun file folder game, which can be used to help children sharpen their discrimination skills. Correctly matching up the cows will encourage children to learn how to recognize subtle differences between objects. The ability to do so, will aid children in every learning aspect of the classroom. I chose to use cows for my farm unit, but this concept can be adapted to fit any unit. I hope that your children enjoy this as much as mine have.

MATERIALS USED:

– File folder
– Our free cow template
– Color coding labels
– Construction paper
– Scissors
– Glue


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Feed the Bunnies Counting Activity

I’ve been teaching for many years, and I am always looking for inexpensive, new ways to present learning opportunities to the children. I recently put together this free Feed the Bunnies math game. This colorful teaching tool attracts the children’s attention, and increases number sense (counting, number recognition, etc.).

We will be using this activity as an extension to the story Home For a Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown. This book is about a bunny is in search of the perfect home in spring. However, when he meets a family of robins, a frog, and a groundhog, the bunny realizes that not every home he finds will suit him. The bunny eventually comes upon the perfect home and someone to share it with. The beautiful illustrations of Garth Williams bring the story to life.

MATERIALS USED:

– White card stock
– Plastic cups
– Our free printable numbered bunnies (1-10)
– Googly eyes
– Cotton balls
– Stapler
– Easter grass
– Plastic carrots (Walmart)


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The Colored Hens Circle Time Activity

One of my favorite children’s books is The Little Red Hen. I read it every year to my class. I often pair the story with this interactive circle time activity, which is designed to improve listening skills, and teach colors. It also gives children an opportunity to follow directions and to participate during large group.

Cut out colored hens to match the colors in the poem (the hen pattern is provided here). I happened to have some extra felt, so I just used that. However, construction paper will work just as well. Glue the hens onto paper plates, add some googly eyes, and coordinating craft sticks. I used watercolors to color the sticks.

During circle time, give each child a hen. Some colors may have to be repeated depending upon how many children are in the circle. Instruct the children to hold up their hen when they hear their color, then read the poem below. This is a fantastic attention grabber. My preschoolers, even my “busy” ones, hold their breath with anticipation, just waiting to hear their color words; they get so excited to spring into action!

THE COLORED HENS POEM

This little hen is brown
You’ll never catch her with a frown

This little hen is black
She’s not a duck, so she doesn’t quack

This little hen is yellow
She’s friends with Mr. Rooster – he’s a happy fellow

This little hen is purple
She likes to walk in a circle

This little hen is green
On the farm she can been seen

This little hen is blue,
She likes to follow me and you

This little hen is red
She’s laid all her eggs in her bed

After the poem is read, and all the hens have been held up, talk about the different colors. To build phonemic awareness, the rhyming words should also be repeated and discussed.

MATERIALS USED:

– Colored felt or construction paper
– Our free hen pattern
– Scissors
– Tacky glue
– Paper plates
– Jumbo craft sticks/tongue depressors
Washable liquid watercolors
– Googly eyes


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St. Patrick’s Day Visual Discrimination Activity

Here is a St. Patrick’s Day activity (free printable) that will allow preschoolers to practice their visual discrimination skills. Opposed to comparing a small group of 3D objects, children must rely on their visual discrimination skills to identify differences and similarities of images. It is important for them to hone these skills in order to strengthen their alphabetic knowledge; they will need to spot the differences between letters. For examples, “b” and “d”, and “m” and “n”.

For younger children, it may be best to work with one line of pictures at a time. Try covering the others with a piece of paper.

Once the child has determined which image is different from the rest, have him/or cover it with a marker. Gold coins work very well and are always popular! For further visual discrimination fun, check out the I Spy book series on Amazon.

Download the free St. Patrick’s Day visual discrimination activity here.


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