Spooky Halloween Sensory Bin

spooky halloween sensory bin

This Halloween sensory bin is made of just a little bit of spooky and a whole lot of fun!

Children learn best by using their senses. Tubs filled with a variety of substances and materials enable young ones to use those senses to explore things that capture their attention. As they manipulate the objects, they are seeing, touching, smelling, and hearing. This allows them to collect information and make discoveries, which leads to the practice of many learning concepts.

spooky halloween sensory bin

Young learners build language, social emotional, and problem solving skills as they work alongside their peers to delve into the bin’s contents. They increase their math skills by counting, sorting, and classifying different elements. Quantity comparisons are also made as they decipher who has more “spiders” or “rocks” in their “cauldrons”. Additionally, scooping, pouring, and picking up different items helps to strengthen fine motor skills and eye-hand coordination.

Without a doubt, sensory bins are one of the best hands-on learning tools. So hurry and gather up a container and some spooky goodies!

MATERIALS USED:

– Any suitable container
– Aquarium gravel
Pom poms
Halloween buttons/embellishments
– Sequins
Mini candy cauldrons
Large googly eyes
Plastic spiders, bats, snakes, centipedes, skeletons
Halloween bouncy balls
– Plastic spoons



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Apple Math and Literacy Activities

It’s been a great summer, and while it’s not quite over, I am already thinking about the fall.

And apples!

This Apple Math and Literacy Activities pack contains printable activities that practice the following skills:

– Visual discrimination
– Following directions
– Upper and lowercase letter recognition
– Pre-writing/visual perception
– Pre-reading/comprehension
– Number recognition
– Classification
– Counting
– Number sequencing
– Ordinal concepts

COUNTING APPLES BOOK (1-10)

Children will cut out the pages of this book and have teachers/adults staple them together. Students can count and write the number of apples on each tree, and then color the pictures. Be sure to keep this activity developmentally appropriate. Some children may need help with cutting and may need you to write the numbers for them. Others may want to count and write their numbers before putting their own pages in numerical order.

ALPHABET CLIP CARDS (A-Z)

Print these cards out on cardstock and laminate for heavy use. Supply your little learners with clothespins and encourage them to clip each letter’s lowercase partner.

NUMBER SEQUENCING STICKS (1-12)

Print these cards out on cardstock and laminate for heavy use. Prompt children to place the cards in numerical order. You may also wish to present different groups of cards (e.g., 4,5,_,7,8) and have your preschoolers determine which number is missing. The cards are also a fun way to teach ordinal concepts (first, second, third, etc.).

Gluing the cards onto jumbo craft sticks makes this activity extra fun for little hands.

VISUAL DISCRIMINATION AND SIZE SORTING WORKSHEETS

With these cute worksheets, kids will find the matching letters and color those apples the same color. They will also sort apples by coloring the large ones red, the medium green, and the small yellow. Make it a point to discuss other words for large and small.

What a fun way to start the new school year!

downloadGet this Apples Math and Literacy Pack.



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Fishy Friends Felt Board Activity

This fish match up game is a quick and easy way to teach colors and provide visual discrimination practice. It can be used as an independent table top exercise, or as a small group activity. In addition, it makes a fun and interactive circle time activity. Pass the fish pairs out, then go around the circle and ask each child to find their fish’s friend. Next direct the children to place their fish pairs side by side on the flannel board. Another alternative is to have the teacher place a fish on the board, and then have the child with the matching fish come up and complete the pair.

Materials Used:

– Felt board
Felt
Tacky glue
Scissors
Glitter Glue
Googly Eyes
Sequins
Our fish template


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Graphing With Jellybeans

Not only is graphing with jellybeans a yummy way to spend some time, it’s also educational; there are so many learning concepts packed into this small activity. Obviously, the main is graphing. But graphing is just the umbrella that covers several mighty and oh-so important math principles. In this particular instance, the children must rely on their color knowlegde to sort and classify the jellybeans. After placing the candy on their graphs, they will use their counting skills (one-to-one correspondence) to count and match the number of beans, in a row, to its corresponding number below.

Hello, number recognition!

Graphing also incorporates the concept of more/less/same. Ask your preschooler/s questions like, “Do you have more red jellybeans or more purple jellybeans – or are they the same?” Children often struggle with the definition of the word ‘less’, so it’s best to emphasize that, “Less means not as many.”

Just a note to add: Many of my fellow teachers ask me about my policy with eating the candy. My own rule is that after the activity is completed, the child may choose ONE special jellybean to enjoy. The rest are bagged up and labeled (by my assistant) and placed in the parent box to take home.

Download the Jellybean Graphing printable here.

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